Articles

A Survival Guide for Widows by Niki Hayden, from the September, 2005 edition of Front Range Living. The article's primary focus is to offer the widow a survivor's blueprint, however much of the information offered is non-gender specific. Includes links specific to the State of Colorado and Boulder, CO.

bbc.co.uk – Mental Health has a nice selection of articles in their Mental Health section. Visit the Bereavement,\r\nCoping Techniques, A-Z Drugs, subsections of Mental Health.

bbc.co.uk – Relationships has a nice selection of articles in their Coping With Grief section. Visit the Bereavement,\r\nTerminal Illnesss, Practical Issues, Q&A with Dr. Ros Taylor, Useful Contacts, or their Further Reading subsections of Coping with Grief.

Commonly Asked Questions About Grief from the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement, discusses commonly questions such as How long will this go on? Am I going mad? Do I have the right to inflict this on others? What can I expect of them and they of me? Is there a right way and a wrong way of coping with grief? How do I know when I need help? and concludes with Ten suggestions on how we might support the bereaved.

Coping with Grieving: What You Can Expect from ElderHope, published by Michael Davis on 08/24/2004, is a question and answer interview about the grieving experience and how to determine when you might need some help.

Emotional Reactions to Loss by Martha M. Tousley, touches upon how “the shock of loss continues in a wave of disbelieving aftershocks.” Ms. Tousley also explains that “as the fog of shock and denial begins to lift, you will find yourself headed into the very heart of grief, and you’ll become painfully aware of how very much you have lost.”

Explaining The Funeral/Memorial Service to Your Children by Martha M. Tousley, helps to answer questions you may have regarding how to explain what is happening to younger children.

Finding Meaning In Your Loss by Martha M. Tousley, helps you to less painfully consider the possibility of finding personal growth through your personal tragedy. “It is difficult to imagine surviving grief much less transcending it. How do you triumph over sorrow when it seems as if your pain will never end?”

5 Rules for Online Dating Over 50 is brought to you by Cherie Burbach and Match.com. “If you're single and over 50, where do you meet that special someone?” For those ready to venture into the world of dating, this article may provide some insight for dot com dating.

From Surviving to Transcending Your Grief by Martha M. Tousley, helps you to recognize and understand progress in your mourning.

Gay Grief and Gay Widowers by Michael Shernoff, MSW, published in LGNY, September 1, 1997, Issue 62 ©1997 Michael Shernoff, discusses the complicated mourning of disenfranchised grief.

Gay Marriage and Gay Widowhood, by Michael Shernoff, MSW, published in The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review, V. IV, No.4, Fall, 1997 © 1997 Michael Shernoff, further discusses the complicated mourning of disenfranchised grief.

Calendar Checklist offers assistant to help with the necessary paperwork needing immediate attention and within the first month. After The First Month helps to guide you through the remaining months of the first year of loss.

Grief and the Triumph of Love by Michael Shernoff, MSW, published in LGNY, Issue 68, Dec. 8, 1997 ©1997 Michael Shernoff. Mr. Shernoff writes about how sharing his personal grief with other gay widowers provided him an informal support network.

The Grief Continuum: Three Stages of Grief Work by Phil Rich, Ed.D., MSW, published in Selfhelp Magazine, © November 9, 1999. “Grief is an inevitable part of life. For some, it's a relatively quick journey lasting a few months; for others, a journey that may take years to complete. This process of working through grief is frequently referred to as 'grief work.'”

Grieving and Loss 101 from ElderHope, published by Michael Davis on 05/10/2003, is a 16 page article dealing with issues of grief such as guilt, the physical toll, spirituality questioning, individuality of grief, and offers guidance for helping children cope with their grief.

Hey! Look At Me, I'm Grieving! by Marie Gordon © 2002, from olderdykes.org. Marie Gordon says, “This is for women who are in this black pit of grief, and who haven’t had that grief acknowledged, much less addressed in the form of words on paper. We are widows, and this is an appeal for compassion, or at least acknowledgment of pain.”

How to Find the Right Therapist by Alice Miller. A guide to help you have success in matching your needs with the right therapist to treat your grief depression. © 2003 Alice Miller (You can read more about the author)

I Still Do is an article relating to the widowed's wearing/not wearing of wedding rings.

Life After Loss is a weekly column to encourage those going through grief. Written by Ferna Lary Mills, author of “The Rainbow: Words of Inspiration, Faith and Hope”, and Betty Sue Eaton, author of “Listening to the Garden Grow”. This weekly column is sponsored by Rainbow Faith, an online Christian grief ministry.

Linda Della Donna's Little Red Mailbox is a collection of articles on grief written by freelance writer, Linda Della Donna. Ms. Donna writes from her own experience as a widow.

Managing Your Grief by Martha M. Tousley, touches upon “Doing Grief Work: It is when denial falls away, when you begin to recognize and experience most intensely all the reactions to your loss, that the real work of mourning begins. In ways that are personal and unique to you alone, you will gradually integrate your loss into the framework of your life, as you slowly give up the reality that included the physical presence of your loved one.”

Physical Reactions to Loss by Martha M. Tousley, explains that there are many responses to grief with this article giving particular emphasis to the physical response.

Returning to Work After a Loss from Michele Baskin-Jones, About.com. Advice and guidance concerning the issue of returning to work after the loss of a loved one.

Seniors and Friendship by Chris Woolston, CONSUMER HEALTH INTERACTIVE, from a Healthy Me. First published July 24, 2000, Last updated December 15, 2004, Copyright © 2000 Consumer Health Interactive. The article addresses the importance of socializing to extend your life and to combat loneliness; an issue relevent to all of ages of widowhood, not just the Senior widowed.

Seniors and Traveling by Nancy Calhoun, CONSUMER HEALTH INTERACTIVE, from a Healthy Me. First published July 24, 2000. Last updated December 16, 2004. Copyright © 2000 Consumer Health Interactive. This article is primarily for the 55 and older “crowd,” but provides excellent ideas and safeguards to consider for those traveling alone in any age group, including organizations which specialize in coordinating travel plans for those traveling alone (especially women).

Social Reactions to Loss by Martha M. Tousley, touches upon the “social” aspect of grief, explaining that “our culture isn’t comfortable with the subject of death, and few of us know how to cope with the pain of loss and grief. We don’t permit or encourage the free expression of sorrow.”

Spiritual Reactions to Loss by Martha M. Tousley, discusses the spiritual aspect of grief, explaining that “regardless of one’s identification or affiliation with an organized religion, spiritual doubts and questions may arise when a loved one dies.” She also offers suggestions for coping with your spiritual reactions.

The Bereaved Employee; Returning to Work from the American Hospice Foundation, © February 15, 2002. Suggestions for preparing yourself for your return to work and what to expect when you return.

The 70-Year Itch: Seniors and Sexuality by Loren Stein, CONSUMER HEALTH INTERACTIVE, from a Healthy Me. First published July 26, 2000. Last updated January 11, 2005. Copyright © 2000 Consumer Health Interactive. The article discusses the issues and obstacles divorced and widowed Seniors face with relation to “generational” judgemental attitudes.

Understanding the Grief Process by Martha M. Tousley. In this article, Ms. Tousley discusses grief and explains (among other things) that “understanding the process and knowing what to expect can help you cope. Your pattern of progressing through your grief will be uneven, unpredictable and unique, with no specific time frame. But the more you learn about grief, the better you can cope with it. In the beginning it will seem as if your grief is running you, but in the end, you can learn to run your grief. When you understand what is happening to you and have some idea of what to expect, you will feel more in control of your grief and will be in a better position to take care of yourself, to find your own way through this loss and to begin rebuilding your life.”

When a Spouse Dies: Dealing With Loss and Grief by Beth Witrogen McLeod, CONSUMER HEALTH INTERACTIVE, from a Healthy Me. First published July 24, 2000, Last updated January 11, 2005, Copyright © 2000 Consumer Health Interactive. The article reviews some myths of grieving, citing that the process of grief is individual and briefly touches on issues of “living with loss.

Who Has The Worst Pain by Andrea Gambill, discusses the commonly asked question.